ACEP Joins Coalition to Oppose Medical Merit Badges

March 30, 2017

The American College of Emergency Physicians is pleased to announce a historic collaboration involving nearly every major emergency medicine organization: The Coalition to Oppose Medical Merit Badges. Coalition members include the following organizations:

  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine (AAEM)
  • American Academy of Emergency Medicine/Resident and Student Association (AAEM/RSA)
  • American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM)
  • American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP)
  • Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine (AACEM)
  • Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD)
  • Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association (EMRA)
  • Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM)

Board-certified emergency physicians who actively maintain their board certification should not be required to complete short-course certification in advanced resuscitation, trauma care, stroke care, cardiovascular care, or pediatric care in order to obtain or maintain medical staff privileges to work in an emergency department. Similarly, mandatory targeted continuing medical education (CME) requirements do not offer any meaningful value for the public or for the emergency physician who has achieved and maintained board certification. Such requirements are often promulgated by others who incompletely understand the foundation of knowledge and skills acquired by successfully completing an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–accredited emergency medicine residency program. These “merit badges” add no additional value for board-certified emergency physicians. Instead, they devalue the board certification process, failing to recognize the rigor of the ABEM Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. In essence, medical merit badges set a lower bar than a diplomate’s education, training, and ongoing learning, as measured by initial board certification and maintenance of certification.

The Coalition finds no rational justification to require medical merit badges for board-certified emergency physicians who maintain their board certification. Our committed professional organizations provide the best opportunities for continuous professional development, and medical merit badges dismiss the quality of those educational efforts.

Opposing the requirements for medical merit badges will be a long and challenging struggle. It will take time to help administrators and regulatory bodies to better understand the rigorous standards to which we adhere as board-certified emergency physicians. In the coming months, we will develop our long-term strategy to create success and a pathway to recognize clinical excellence.

We welcome your thoughts and suggestions as to how we can best succeed. In the near future, we will ask for strong support and a loud and unified voice.

We will persist and we are up to the challenge—we are board-certified emergency physicians. Opposing medical merit badges is the right thing to do for our specialty. We will forever demonstrate a lifelong commitment to caring for anyone who is ill or injured, at any time, for any reason.

Sincerely,
Kevin G. Rodgers, MD
President, AAEM

Mary Haas, MD
President, AAEM/RSA

Michael L. Carius, MD
President, ABEM

John J. Rogers, MD
Chair of the Board, ACEP

Richard Zane, MD
President, AACEM

Saadia Akhtar, MD
President, CORD

Alicia Kurtz, MD
President, EMRA

Andra L. Blomkalns, MD
President, SAEM

ACEP Signs CMSS Letter on International Collaboration in Medicine

This week, ACEP signed a letter from the Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS) expressing “concern that the recent executive order suspending some foreign entry into the United States will have a negative impact on patient care, medical research, the education of health professionals, and international scientific collaboration.”

ACEP joins more than 30 other medical associations in signing the CMSS letter, which aligns with ACEP’s mission and values of access to care for all, diversity and inclusion, medical education support and research.

Read the entire statement and see the other medical specialties that join ACEP in expressing these views.

ACEP Board: Statement on Rapid Transitions of ED Contracts

The following statement was issued by the ACEP Board of Directors on January 27, 2017

The ACEP Board of Directors and its leadership have had multiple communications with the parties involved and others affected by the recent abrupt emergency department contract transition at a health system in Ohio. The ACEP Board met recently and discussed the matter extensively.

Rapid transition of emergency department contracts may lead to serious disruption. Assuring that any such process is as smooth as possible is critically important to our specialty, and to ACEP.

ACEP is committed to promoting the highest quality of emergency care. To effectively achieve our mission, we are committed to supporting and protecting the interests of our specialty, patients, all members, residents in training programs, and academic and research elements of emergency medicine.

ACEP will be developing a white paper regarding best practices for how contract transitions should occur. When completed, it will not only be disseminated to the emergency medicine community, but also to hospitals and their administrators. We will also be publicizing to our members the availability of existing resources regarding ED contract provisions, negotiations, and other related materials.

We welcome the input of our members and others as we develop supportive resources.