Maisonneuve Fx…

This patient presented to the ED after twisting their ankle playing basketball.  Notably on clinical exam the patient also had pain to palpation near the proximal lower leg:

 

Massoneuve Fx 2

Massoneuve Fx 3

These radiographs show two clearly visible fractures on the proximal and distal fibula.  Also noted is some widening of the mortis on gravity stress view and if you look closely on the anterior tib/fib image (top) there is a comminuted proximal tibia fracture.  The injury pattern seen here is an example of a Maisonneuve type fracture.

A Maisonneuve fracture occurs when with disruption of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis is associated with a proximal fibular fracture.  Often a medial malleolar fracture will be seen as well (not in this image).  This is an unstable fracture pattern that often needs operative intervention.  This image has an additional proximal tibia fracture that isn’t usually classic for a Maisonneuve fracture pattern.

In order not to miss this fracture one should always perform a proximal lower leg exam with all ankle injuries!  Image the entire fibula if there is pain.

Author:  Russell Jones, MD

 


Filed under: Ankle XR, Eponyms, Leg XR, Orthopedics, Trauma, XR Tagged: Maisonneuve

WWWTP #20 Answer…

This patient presented to the ED with a headache.

delta-sign

 

This patient has an “Empty delta sign” in the superior sagittal  sinus (blue arrow).  This is indicative of dural venous sinus thrombosis.  There is a clot (dark) among normal blood in the sinus (light).  Remember to look at your sinuses for this rare occurrence.

Image Contributor:  Adriel Watts, MD

Author:  Russell Jones, MD


Filed under: CNS, CT, Head, Non-Trauma, WWWTP

What are these devices? Answer…

Question earlier this week:  “There are two devices entering the mediastinal structures from below…what are they?”

IABP 2

iabp-2

There are a bunch of devices on this radiograph.  Here they are by color:

1.  Orange arrow:  A Swan-Ganz catheter coming up from the femoral vein

2.  Red arrow:  Intra-aortic balloon pump coming up from the femoral artery

3.  Green arrow:  External monitor cables extending to the various monitor points on the patient externally

4.  Blue arrow: Dialysis catheter coming from the right internal jugular vein

Admittedly, this is not your usual ED-based radiograph.  This patient was presented with a STEMI and in cardiogenic shock.  This was a radiograph obtained later in the cardiac ICU after coronary intervention.  The Swan-Ganz catheter is unclear if it is in proper position (pulmonary artery).  Usually Swan-Ganz catheters (AKA pulmonary artery catheters) are placed from the superior circulation and loop into the pulmonary artery.  This was placed under fluoroscopy while performing a coronary artery intervention in the cath lab; I’m not sure where the tip is located based on this radiograph.

Author:  Russell Jones, MD


Filed under: Chest XR, Devices, Non-Trauma, XR Tagged: Swan-Ganz