EMconf 2015 – Week #3 Highlights and Transcript

Week number 3 of the 2015 #EMconf archive is now available for download at the EMconf Archive.  This Symplur transcript includes all #EMconf tweets, including links and images.  Over the last 7 days the Emergency Medicine training program conference/lecture series hashtag generated > 370,000 impressions via >550 tweets by 190 participants.

Last week’s most frequently mentioned EM programs (mentions and retweets) were: Stony Brook (@StonyBrookEM), Washington University in St. Louis (@WUSTL_EM), Northwestern (@NorthwesternEM), and King’s County (@kingsofcounty).  They must have had something good to say – be sure to give them a follow.

Leading contributors (original tweets) for Week #3: @muscemergency,  @docbond007, @wustl_EM, @bryantkallen, @flatbushEM, @evanleibner, @stonybrookem, @terrancetleemd, @UCmorningreport, @danieljafari.

The first EMconf tweet of the week  – by @DocBond007 – was also one of the most noticed:

This one from Wash U also got a lot of attention:

This came in from Capetown :

Coincidentally, there was a spike in the #shitmallonsays hashtag last week.  One representative pearl (thanks Stony Brook!): 

And finally, in the spirit of the in-training exam that many EM residents will be taking in a few weeks, Billy Mallon also gave some test taking advice:

 

Do you tweet from your weekly conference/lecture series?  Add #EMconf to your tweets and join the global conversation!

A continuous feed from #EMconf and other leading FOAM hashtags is always available at FOAMfeeds.

 

Emconf_3

 

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Quick Poll: Procedures on the recently deceased?

The Annals of Emergency Medicine will soon be publishing the following article:

The Ethics of Using the Recently Deceased to Instruct Residents in Cricothyrotomy by Dr. Andrew Makowski

In light of past experiences, and in the context of my “other” occupation as a clinical ethicist, I posted a link on Twitter and got this response from Dr. Casey Parker, of BroomeDocs.com:

 

Followed by this, from Dr. Seth Trueger:

 

This led to a few other responses from some very smart people on Twitter.  See the full conversation, Storified, here

Now, although I was happy to read the piece and felt that Dr. Makowski really did a great job of getting down to the key issues, I’ve begun to wonder.   How common is the practice of performing invasive procedures on recently deceased patients in the Emergency Department?  Have you seen this happen?  Heard of it?  Ever participated?

Please help us out by taking a minute to respond to this short poll (also embedded below).  It’s just my attempt to get a sense of how the EM and Critical Care communities – at least those who are online – feel about the question.  

Thank you! 

 ~David  

~Many thanks to Dr’s Parker and Truger who took the time to give the survey a once-over prior to release. 

 

If you have any trouble with the embedded form, just follow this link: http://goo.gl/forms/5CXxmDMXpC  – please share with your friends!

The poll will be accepting responses until Feb. 6 at 23:59, US ET (GMT-5).

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Week #2 #EMconf Archive Is Now Available

Week number 2 of the 2015 #EMconf archive is now available for download here.  This Symplur transcript includes all #EMconf tweets, including links and images.  Over the last 7 days the Emergency Medicine training program conference/lecture series hashtag generated > 270,000 impressions via >380 tweets by 140 participants.

The most frequently mentioned EM programs in last week’s tweets and retweets were: Northwestern (@NorthwesternEM), Washington University in St. Louis (@WUSTL_EM), University of Maryland EM (@UMEmergencyMed), and Carolinas Medical Center (@CMCEM).  They must have had something good to say – be sure to give them a follow.

Leading participants this week were: @danieljafari, @mkleinmd, @docbond007, @wustl_EM, @stanfordemres, @em_stevemcguire, @pedemmorsels, @northwesternEM, @dukeemergency, @emswami.

Something to think about from Washington University in St. Louis (@WUSTL_EM):

Another one from Wash U that got a lot of attention:

 

And a couplet from @EMSwami on the HEART Score validation: 

 

Do you tweet from your weekly conference/lecture series?  Add #EMconf to your tweets and join the global conversation!

A continuous feed from #EMconf and other leading FOAM hashtags is always available at FOAMfeeds.

 

Wk2

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A New Year of #EMconf – Catch the Wave!

Week number 1 of the 2015 #EMconf archive is now available for download here.  This Symplur transcript includes all #EMconf tweets, with their links and images.  Over the last 7 days the Emergency Medicine training program conference/lecture series hashtag generated > 270,000 impressions via >350 tweets by 160 participants.

The most frequently mentioned EM programs in last week’s tweets and retweets were: Carolinas Medical Center (@CMCEM), University of Maryland EM (@UMEmergencyMed), @EMcapetown, UTHSC San Antonio (@SanAntonioEM), Washington University in St. Louis (@WUSTL_EM).  They must have had something good to say – be sure to give them a follow.

Leading participants this week were: @PedEMMorsels, @WUSTL_EM, @jminardi21, @docbond007, @EM_stevemcguire, @zahra_kasim, @ernestoalarco, @jeremyfaust, @emswami, @upennem. See if you recognize anymore participants in the image below.

Do you tweet from your weekly conference/lecture series?  Add #EMconf to your tweets and join the global conversation!

As always, a continuous feed from #EMconf and other leading FOAM hashtags is available at FOAMfeeds.

emconf_Capture2

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Rumblings…

Hello!  (if anyone is still there…)Be Right Back

It’s been a while.  

Just a quick note to say that the Conferences Page is down and being redesigned.  If you know of any new Medical Education, EM, Critical Care, Medical Ethics, Ultrasound, or Toxicology conferences that should be included in the listing, or any existing meetings that I neglected to include in the past, please let me know via comment here, or in the form on the page itself.

For now, be sure to follow Stanford’s Medicine X (#MedX) on twitter or at FOAMfeeds.  

I’ll be right back! 

~David

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It’s a Med Ed Maelstrom!

maelstrom

 

No, not really.

But this is a very busy weekend for EM and Med Ed types with five (yes, five) great medical conferences running simultaneously.  In the past you’d have been lucky to attend one or two of these, but thanks to the wonders of the interwebs and an amazing community of educators and learners, you can now soak up the wisdom pouring out of all 5 meetings right from the comfort of your ___________ (fill-in your favorite down-time spot).

You thought the polar vortex was bad?

The FOAM world is still dealing with the aftershocks of SMACCgold and now we have these to sort through:

  • Critical Care: Resuscitation 2014 (#Resus14)
  • Toxicology: ACMT 2014 (#ACMT2014)
  • Ultrasound: AIUM 2014 (#AIUM14)
  • Emergency Medicine Education: CORD-EM (#CORDAA14)
  • Transport Medicine: Critical Care Transport Medicine Conference (#CCTMC14)

Here’s how you’re going to stay on top of it all

Keep up with these, and other meetings in future, by using any/all of the following strategies:

  1. Visit the Conferences section on this website for a listing of upcoming meetings, their hashtags and twitter accounts, and affiliated websites.
  2. Follow each conference # (hashtag) individually on Twitter or using a multi-list app such as Tweetdeck.
    1. This is the simplest method, but the most labor intensive.
    2. You’ll have to look up each hashtag, save your searches, and then check each feed in your app.
  3. Follow key persons at each meeting.
    1. Some meetings will have official, and session specific, twitter accounts.  For example: @CORD_SMW and @SAEMonline
    2. Resuscitation 2014 had a social media team.  Instead of following the entire public conversation, you could follow only team members to see high yield posts from dedicated iReporters.
    3. Follow @ALiEMconf - The twitter account used by Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) iReporters during conferences.  Always high yield.
  4. Go to the Live Conferences page at FOAMfeeds to see all the conversations (hashtag feeds) on one page.
  5. Join any Google+ communities centered around the conferences
  6. Keep an eye out for bloggers’ meeting summaries.  Examples: Bodymender’s Storify and this by Minh Le Cong on SMACC Gold

Breathe In – Breathe Out

Remember, you don’t have to contribute.  And this doesn’t have to take over your life.  You can simply scan the feed when you have a few minutes and click on any interesting links.  Save them for later.  Discuss them with your colleagues.  If you do have a question, or if you disagree with something that was said, just fit your message in 140 characters or less and be sure to include the conference hashtag.  Someone will probably get back to you.  If you’re lucky it might even be one of the speakers.  For more on how to make your tweets count see Conference Tweeting: Don’t Start Tweet with @ Symbol by Bryan Hayes on Academic Life in Emergency Medicine.

Happy learning!  If you have any other tips I hope you’ll share them in the comments box below.

~David

Full Disclosure: I am a member of the Resus 2014 social media team and have served on the SAEM Social Media Committee

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