Primary Survey: the highlights of January 2018

Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the January 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, picked by Ellen Webber (Editor-in-Chief, University of California, San Francisco, USA). Read the primary survey here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/1. Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below: Impact of Physician Navigators on productivity indicators in the ED - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/5 Tackling the demand for emergency department services: there are no silver bullets - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/3 Emergency consultants value medical scribes and most prefer to work with them, a few would rather not: a qualitative Australian study - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/12 Can an observational pain assessment tool improve time to analgesia for cognitively impaired older persons? A cluster randomised controlled trial - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/33 Failure of falls risk screening tools to predict outcome: a prospective cohort study - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/28 PREDICT prioritisation study: establishing the research priorities of paediatric emergency medicine physicians in Australia and New Zealand - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/39 Profile and outcomes of critically ill children in a lower middle-income country - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/52 Characteristics of youth agreeing to electronic sexually transmitted infection risk assessment in the emergency department - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/46 Waveform capnography: an alternative to physician gestalt in determining optimal intubating conditions after administration of paralytic agents - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/62

Read the full January issue of EMJ here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1

Primary Survey: the highlights of the October 2017 issue of the Emergency Medicine Journal

Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the October 2017 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, picked by Richard Body (Emergency Department, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK). Read the primary survey: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/633. Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below: The use of whole-body computed tomography in major trauma: variations in practice in UK trauma hospitals - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/647 Non-traumatic incidental findings in patients undergoing whole-body computed tomography at initial emergency admission - emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/643 Whole body computed tomography for trauma: friend or foe? - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/635 Extreme event medicine: considerations for the organisation of out-of-hospital care during obstacle, adventure and endurance competitions http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/680 Ibuprofen versus placebo effect on acute kidney injury in ultramarathons: a randomised controlled trial - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/637 Gender, race and the presentation of acute coronary syndrome and serious cardiopulmonary diagnoses in ED patients with chest pain - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/653 Primary care services co-located with Emergency Departments across a UK region: early views on their development - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10/672

Read the full October issue of EMJ: http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/10.

August 2017’s Primary Survey

Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the August 2017 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal. Read the primary survey here: emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/491 Details of the papers mentioned on this podcast can be found below: Clinical relevance of pharmacist intervention in an emergency department - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/495 Developing a decision rule to optimise clinical pharmacist resources for medication reconciliation in the emergency department - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/502 Emergency medicine pharmacists on an international scale - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/492 ‘Major trauma’: now two separate diseases? - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/494 Traumatic brain injuries in older adults—6 years of data for one UK trauma centre: retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/509 Validating the Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) and Troponin-only Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (T-MACS) rules for the prediction of acute myocardial infarction in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/517 A practical approach to Events Medicine provision - emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/538 BET 1: Lidocaine with propofol to reduce pain on injection - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/551.2 BET 2: Poor evidence on whether teaching cognitive debiasing, or cognitive forcing strategies, lead to a reduction in errors attributable to cognition in emergency medicine students or doctors - http://emj.bmj.com/content/34/8/553

Read the full August issue here: emj.bmj.com/content/34/8