14 Ways To Know Whether You Are Failing As A Hospital Administrator

Failure

I’ve been an administrator.

I’ve seen hospitals in which a strong leadership team has improved the hospital’s market share and I’ve seen hospitals that have closed and that are struggling to stay open due to a failed administrative team. Here are some common traits I’ve seen in the failures:

1. You don’t know the names of the people who work in your corporation. You aren’t fooling anyone when you walk the halls without addressing people by their names. All this shows is that you don’t care to take the time to know them. If you don’t take the time to get to know them, why should they care about your corporation?

2. You spend a lot of time and effort seeking feedback about your employees’ performance, but you spend little or no time seeking feedback about your own performance. All this shows is that you are a hypocrite. People hate hypocrites.

3. Your hospital has a high employee turnover rate. This isn’t an issue with employees, it is a clear and unequivocal issue with management. People don’t leave their jobs, they leave their bosses. If your hospital has a high turnover in one department and you aren’t seriously evaluating that department manager’s work, you have no business running a hospital.

4. Your “help wanted” listings go unfilled. In an economy with high unemployment, the fact that people would choose to stay unemployed rather than work for you and your organization is a good reflection of the public opinion about the business you are running.

5. Your employees leave the room when you walk in or they try to avoid you in the hallways. When no one wants to be around you in your workplace, it isn’t a sign of respect, it’s a sign of disgust. Keep that in mind the next time you see someone duck into a stairwell when they see you walking down the hall.

6. You don’t show up at holiday parties for your employees. If you feel uncomfortable mingling with your employees at a party, you shouldn’t be trying to lead them. The good thing is that if you feel uncomfortable attending an employee party, your employees probably won’t want you there, anyway.

7. You don’t participate in charity events for employees or employee family members. Your failure to support your employees in their times of need will only drive everyone to dislike you even more.

8. You don’t support employees who have been injured. Or worse yet, you try to terminate employees who have been injured. News of these types of actions spreads quickly through the hospital. Again, if you don’t have their backs, what makes you think that they’ll have yours?

9. You care more about your bottom line than you care about your patients’ or your employees’ bottom lines. When you create policies to increase your bonuses, you employees will know and they will resent you for it. They may even make passive aggressive attempts to keep you from reaching your goals.

10. You spend more time criticizing your employees than you do complimenting your employees. Worse yet – you don’t compliment your employees at all.

11. You display favoritism. If you allow anyone to drop your name or to use their relationship with you to gain an advantage at work, your employees will quickly grow to resent you and your clique.

12. You discourage constructive criticism of your organization from within. If you think everything is going just fine in your facility, you’re out of touch and you’re wrong.

13. You don’t act on employee concerns. Your failure to follow up on an employee concern not only shows that you’re unreliable, but it also may serve as a basis for legal action if something related to that concern goes wrong.

14. You don’t visit the departments in your hospital on a regular basis. If it’s been more than a week since you’ve visited any department in your hospital, you have lost a great opportunity to compliment your employees on the job that they are doing. You have also lost the ability to uncover and address small problems before they become big problems.

Ride on

This is no obituary. An obituary encapsulates the entirety of a life in a few short paragraphs. Instead, these are simply words to give physical form to the roaring grief twisting its way through the hearts of anybody who knew and loved John Hinds (@docjohnhinds).

It has only been a blink of a week since we left Chicago. At #smaccUS we had found a new hero to revere, because we found the embodiment of the anti-hero. John represented all that was good about the world of Social Media and Critical Care. He managed to make us all question our motives, he inspired us to examine the self-congratulatory fiesta into which we are all at risk of succumbing, and he showed us how to make the very best decisions we could, for the very best of reasons. Those talks will live on, and they will do so now in perpetuity, for generations of people who desire to find ways to become better versions of themselves.

John was irreverent, impossibly funny, devastatingly incisive, and was one of the most authentic speakers to have ever graced the SMACC stage. Through his talks and his accomplishments, we knew that here was a man who would change the future.

But now, his day is done. He will speak no more at SMACC. He will no longer race behind motorbikes, mopping up the injured within moments of their mistakes. He will not be relentless in his push for better pre-hospital care for Northern Ireland. He will not see the sun set again.

No one can second-guess the dead. But we can be sure that the legacy of John Hinds will scatter like sand across the oceans and continents. And we can be confident that he would be quietly pleased that his influence will continue to inspire countless clinicians to do better, to be as honest as possible in their actions, and that an army will gather to push for better pre-hospital trauma care, galvanized by this unlikely leader in his death.

John, your memory will be honoured by every person who has ever heard you speak, anyone who has listened to your words, and seen your deeds. The future will be changed. You can lie easy, knowing that you have thrown a mighty stone into a willing pond, and the ripples and the wake will not end.

Rest In Peace.

hinds smacc chicago

hinds smacc passion

tweet hinds smacc

Hinds Tweet Brian Burns


tweet hinds habig

petition john hinds

Click this image to go to the Change.org petition

deathisawanker

The post Ride on appeared first on LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog.

Ride on

This is no obituary. An obituary encapsulates the entirety of a life in a few short paragraphs. Instead, these are simply words to give physical form to the roaring grief twisting its way through the hearts of anybody who knew and loved John Hinds (@docjohnhinds).

It has only been a blink of a week since we left Chicago. At #smaccUS we had found a new hero to revere, because we found the embodiment of the anti-hero. John represented all that was good about the world of Social Media and Critical Care. He managed to make us all question our motives, he inspired us to examine the self-congratulatory fiesta into which we are all at risk of succumbing, and he showed us how to make the very best decisions we could, for the very best of reasons. Those talks will live on, and they will do so now in perpetuity, for generations of people who desire to find ways to become better versions of themselves.

John was irreverent, impossibly funny, devastatingly incisive, and was one of the most authentic speakers to have ever graced the SMACC stage. Through his talks and his accomplishments, we knew that here was a man who would change the future.

But now, his day is done. He will speak no more at SMACC. He will no longer race behind motorbikes, mopping up the injured within moments of their mistakes. He will not be relentless in his push for better pre-hospital care for Northern Ireland. He will not see the sun set again.

No one can second-guess the dead. But we can be sure that the legacy of John Hinds will scatter like sand across the oceans and continents. And we can be confident that he would be quietly pleased that his influence will continue to inspire countless clinicians to do better, to be as honest as possible in their actions, and that an army will gather to push for better pre-hospital trauma care, galvanized by this unlikely leader in his death.

John, your memory will be honoured by every person who has ever heard you speak, anyone who has listened to your words, and seen your deeds. The future will be changed. You can lie easy, knowing that you have thrown a mighty stone into a willing pond, and the ripples and the wake will not end.

Rest In Peace.

hinds smacc chicago

hinds smacc passion

tweet hinds smacc

Hinds Tweet Brian Burns


tweet hinds habig

petition john hinds

Click this image to go to the Change.org petition

deathisawanker

The post Ride on appeared first on LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog.

ED Procedures: new site and new courses!

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